Renal Pathology-Immunology

Renal pathology is a subspecialty of anatomic pathology that compacts with the diagnosis and classification of medical diseases (non-tumor) of the kidneys. In the theoretical setting, renal pathologists work closely with nephrologists and transplant surgeons, who typically obtain diagnostic specimens via percutaneous renal biopsy. The renal pathologist must synthesize outcomes from light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence to obtain a conclusive diagnosis. Medical renal diseases may affect the glomerulus, the tubules and interstitial, the vessels, or a combination of these compartments.

Kidney biopsies (renal biopsy) permit us to analyze renal disorders; review anticipations; help in the resolve of a precise remedial approach; and screen ailment movement in both local and allograft transplant kidneys. To outstandingly misuse renal biopsy examples, a blend of light, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy is used. Each microscopy requires distinctive approaches for fixation and preparing, so each renal biopsy centers are universally separated into three sections. Liable upon the length of the biopsy center or suspected illness process; in any case, the strategy for partitioning the biopsy center might be altered.

  • Anatomic pathology
  • Diagnosis & Characterization Electron microscopy
  • Glomerulus the tubules
  • Immunofluorescence
  • Medical diseases (non-tumor) of the kidneys
  • Medical renal diseases
  • Renal biopsy
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Diagnostic immunology
  • Immune deficiency
  • Immunosuppression
  • Immunotherapy
  • Primary immune diseases